Missouri state senate candidate with shady law enforcement history part of Darren Wilson fundraiser

iwriteaboutfeminism:

A Missouri state representative is one of the men behind the Support Officer Wilson fundraiser on GoFundMe. The page, which mysteriously stopped accepting donations on Saturday, was run by Shield of Hope, a charity associated with the police union in Ferguson. Representative Jeffrey Roorda is the charity’s Vice President.

Roorda, a former police officer, has a very questionable history. In 2001, he was fired from the police force in Arnold, Missouri (18 miles south of St. Louis) for filing false statements, according to the L.A. Times.

His superiors accused him of filing a false statement against a suspect in 1997 and against his own police chief when the chief declined to give Roorda paid paternity leave, according to Missouri court records.

Roorda responded at the time that he’d been unjustly fired, but he lost his appeals.

Inexplicably, Roorda was then hired by the Kimmswick police department, five miles away, as their police chief. He also became the business manager of the St. Louis Police Association. When asked recently by the Post-Dispatch, Roorda said that neither he, nor the Police Association, support the use of dashboard cameras in police vehicles.

In 2004, Roorda ran for state representative in the 113th district, representing the Arnold, Imperial, and Barnhart areas as a Democrat. He is a member of the House Committee on Crime Prevention and Public Safety, which is problematic at best. A bill he introduced this January would have made it a crime to release the name of any police officer involved in any shooting, including any records or documents about the shooting containing the officer’s name, even if they were off-duty at the time, unless and until the officer had criminal charges filed against them. Luckily, the bill went nowhere, but if it had passed, we still wouldn’t know Darren Wilson’s name today. Roorda is now running for state senate.

You’d think that a politician currently running for a higher office would be hesitant to assist a police officer who shot and killed a teenage boy in broad daylight, but Roorda told the L.A. Times that he has no such qualms.

“I can tell you that every single voter in my district that I’ve talked to wants to reserve judgment on Officer Wilson and on Michael Brown until the facts are out there. … The people in my district just care about getting the facts and about justice being done.”

Asking for all the facts is pretty rich coming from the guy who tried to make it illegal to release the names of officers involved in shootings. If Roorda’s district is as racist as he’s implying it is, he may end up in the state senate as he plans. 

Tuesday, 2 September 2014

bvsedjesus:

the FBI is investigating who leaked all those nudes but darren wilson is free & cops are breaking the law. lol ok.

sassysinglelady:

niall-andsomebrits:

thecommonraven:

sassysinglelady:



  compliments don’t get people killed. 

Read the caption of the first picture though. It’s clearly satire/parody, not serious.

http://nypost.com/2014/08/18/enough-sanctimony-ladies-catcalls-are-flattering/
it’s a 100% real post that this woman wrote
it’s not a satire/parody

sassysinglelady:

niall-andsomebrits:

thecommonraven:

sassysinglelady:

image

  compliments don’t get people killed. 

Read the caption of the first picture though. It’s clearly satire/parody, not serious.

http://nypost.com/2014/08/18/enough-sanctimony-ladies-catcalls-are-flattering/

it’s a 100% real post that this woman wrote

it’s not a satire/parody

godshideouscreation:

pastel-gizibe:

forcoloredgirlswhodgaf:

cultureunseen:

Charda Gregory abducted, humiliated, violated, restrained, scalped and tortured. 
If this were reversed, with black police officers who were sworn to uphold peace and justice but instead were documented victimizing a white woman (who was already a victim), this news would have trumped the Olympics!

Truncated version: drugged at a party, abducted to a motel, wakes up during unwanted sexual violation in a motel room full of strangers, fights like hell to escape, motel employee calls the authorities, she gets arrested for destroying motel property and it just gets worst from there.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoBLolqUaNg 

Every officer who participated in it and even those who witnessed it and did nothing should be punished but instead they just fired the woman?
No rape kit, no police report on the people inside the motel room, no investigation of her claims, no accountability for missing motel entry records, no video from the motel but she gets detained for fourteen days?

(Btw, when did your tax dollars begin purchasing Abu Ghraib type water boarding chairs?)

http://www.wxyz.com/news/local-news/investigations/cut-on-camera-cop-slices-off-young-mothers-artificial-hair

I get angrier and angrier everyday when I see things like this.

I AM SO ANGRY

odinsblog:

Racial bias in America: from higher suspension rates in preschool, to disproportionate rates of capital punishment, to everything in between, structures of authority routinely allow anti-Black racial bias to color the “facts”, and warp the narrative. And frequently (whether unintentional or otherwise) the police and the media often work together to further criminalize innocent Black victims

1Criminalizing Blackness in America

2. 14-year-old Tremaine McMillian attacked and choked by police, literally while holding a puppy…because McMillian made them “feel threatened” and gave them “dehumanizing stares

3. Author and CNN contributor keithboykin: how the AP slandered Renisha McBride even in death

4.  The Associated Press: when can skin color alone determine who is and who isn’t a looter? (hint: don’t be Black)

5. Lauren Davidson: Disturbing Study Proves That Cops View Black Children Differently 

This implicit racial bias does not magically stop at innocuous events like the VMAs, or in »Hollywood. So far, it doesn’t ever turn off. There are two Americas and racial bias is as ubiquitous as the air we breathe

Caitlin Stasey being the hero we all deserve.

thetwoteddybeardoctors:

"You shouldn’t be worried about equality, women can vote!" Ah yes now I can choose which straight white man can oppress me what a time to be alive

pardonmewhileipanic:

christel-thoughts:

Perfect

that’s because people value money more than women

pardonmewhileipanic:

christel-thoughts:

Perfect

that’s because people value money more than women

What Happened To Jennifer Lawrence Was Sexual Assault

comradewodka:

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn
These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.
It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
Men speak more, more often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classrooms, boardrooms, legislative bodies, expert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.
The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”
This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.
Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60′s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off
In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”
 Really, practice those ten words. 
“Stop interrupting me.” 
“I just said that.”
“No explanation needed.”
 

The link about “confusing women’s language with powerless language” is really interesting.

comradewodka:

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn

These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.

  • It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
  • For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
  • This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
  • As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
  • Men speak moremore often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classroomsboardroomslegislative bodiesexpert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
  • Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
  • Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
  • Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
  • On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.

The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”

This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.

Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off

In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”

 Really, practice those ten words

“Stop interrupting me.” 

“I just said that.”

“No explanation needed.”

 

The link about “confusing women’s language with powerless language” is really interesting.

angrywocunited:

White Man from San Diego Waves Gun Around Small Children In Confrontation With Police and Is Taken Into Custody Alive.  

This white man walked towards the police with a gun pointed at them and they spend half an hour talking to him before they shoot him one time. If he had been a black man, they would’ve shot him dead. Before you police apologists claim this man has a history of mental illness (he does) that’s why the police was lenient,  Ezell Ford, a mentally ill black man, was recently killed by the LAPD. 

sexy-fruit:

I don’t understand how all Muslims are called terrorists because of what one group of 19 extremist men did 13 years ago.

But white people aren’t called terrorists when they invaded their countries, killed millions of civilians, when they shoot up schools, shoot up movie theaters, and kill random POC. Isn’t that something.

janefoster:

basically my life can be summed up in alternating periods of Linda Belcher’s “Alriiiiight!” and Bob Belcher’s “Oh my god”

 
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